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Central Asia and South Caucasus Affairs: 2006
Central Asia and South Caucasus Affairs: 2006
 
Regional Security Issues: 2006
Regional Security Issues: 2006
 
Between the Black and Caspian Seas: New Challenges and Opportunities for the South Caucasus
Between the Black and Caspian Seas: New Challenges and Opportunities for the South Caucasus
 
 
Regional Security Issues
Regional Security Issues
 
The South Caucasus as a Part of the Wider Europe
The South Caucasus as a Part of the Wider Europe
 
Central Asia   Last Updated ( Thursday, 12 April 2007 )
Central AsiaCentral Asia has long been a strategic location because of its proximity to several great powers. It has also remained under the influence of various empires throughout its history. By the end of the 19th century the Russian Empire became the dominant power in the region. After the Russian revolution the occupied territories were incorporated into the Soviet Union. In 1991 five countries of the Soviet “Middle Asia” attained the status of independent states.

The total area of the five republics is approximately 3.9 million square kilometers. The region stretches from the Caspian Sea in the west to China in the east, and from central Siberia in the north to Afghanistan, Iran, and Pakistan in the south. The region contains enormous natural and agricultural resources. All five republics have favorable agricultural regions and some combination of attractive minerals and fuels.

To read more details on the five states of Central Asia click on a country below: