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Central Asia and South Caucasus Affairs: 2006
Central Asia and South Caucasus Affairs: 2006
 
Regional Security Issues: 2006
Regional Security Issues: 2006
 
Between the Black and Caspian Seas: New Challenges and Opportunities for the South Caucasus
Between the Black and Caspian Seas: New Challenges and Opportunities for the South Caucasus
 
 
Regional Security Issues
Regional Security Issues
 
The South Caucasus as a Part of the Wider Europe
The South Caucasus as a Part of the Wider Europe
 
South Caucasus   Last Updated ( Thursday, 12 April 2007 )

South CaucasusThe South Caucasus is often regarded as a transitional region between Europe and Asia. It extends from the Greater Caucasus to the Turkish and Iranian borders, between the Black and Caspian seas. The region remained under the influence of various conquerors such as Persians, Greeks, Romans, Armenians, Arabs, Turks and Mongols. It was first unified as an independent federal democratic Transcaucasian republic which existed in 1917–18. The federation was dissolved and shortly after the three republics were conquered by the Red Army, the Transcaucasian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic was formed. In 1936, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia were reestablished as separate union republics. In 1991, all three republics seceded from the USSR.

The region’s natural resources are oil, manganese, copper, clays, and building stones. Manufactures include oil-industry machinery, mining equipment, metal products, automobiles, chemicals, plastics, cotton and silk cloth, and leather footwear. The area’s chief crops are cotton, grain, sugar beets, sunflowers, tobacco, citrus fruits, tea, and plants for essential oils.
 

To read more details on the three states of South Caucasus click on a country below: