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Central Asia and South Caucasus Affairs: 2006
Central Asia and South Caucasus Affairs: 2006
 
Regional Security Issues: 2006
Regional Security Issues: 2006
 
Between the Black and Caspian Seas: New Challenges and Opportunities for the South Caucasus
Between the Black and Caspian Seas: New Challenges and Opportunities for the South Caucasus
 
 
Regional Security Issues
Regional Security Issues
 
The South Caucasus as a Part of the Wider Europe
The South Caucasus as a Part of the Wider Europe
 
Food along the Silk Route   Last Updated ( Monday, 15 January 2007 )

Silk Road Seattle Food

For many people, their first exposure to other cultures comes through food. What people eat in traditional cultures is determined both by natural conditions and the local economy and also by ritual and belief--often religious views regulate what may and may not be consumed even if it could be produced. Food culture goes beyond simply what is consumed; it generally involves particular rituals of serving, hospitality, and celebration. more...

Savouring the Silk Road
JEREMY FERGUSON
FoodLike religion, philosophy and spices, food has travelled the great trade route in western China, yielding what may be the world's first fusion cuisine.
Breakfast in the remote Chinese town of Aksu would astonish even Marco Polo, who journeyed this stretch of the fabled Silk Road eight centuries ago.In front of us are three soups: rice congee, corn porridge and geda, a blend of vegetables, egg and spices. Garlicky greens, green gourd with sesame oil, fried green chilies, fermented tofu, boiled peanuts, lamb dumplings, steamed buns stuffed with lamb...more...

Silk Road Cooking: A Vegetarian Journey Silk Road Cooking
by Najmieh BatmanglijNajmieh Batmanglij
Iranian-born Batmanglij, author of several other books on Persian food, has spent a good part of the last 25 years traveling the ancient "Silk Road," the spice and trade route from China through the Middle East to Italy. Because of economic realities, the fare native to those countries has been vegetable-based, so Batmanglij concentrates on that here, though her book will certainly appeal to nonvegetarians as well. She presents diverse and wide-ranging recipes, both familiar and exotic, from Alexandrian Spicy Fava Bean Spread to Afghan Garlic Chive Ravioli, among many others, set against a background of culinary and cultural history. more...

The Flavor Of the Silk Road
From Wontons to Ravioli, From Pita To Pizza: A Culinary Journey
By Judith Weinraub
Consider the Chinese wonton. The Indian samosa. The Italian ravioli.
They are different foods from different parts of the world. But each reveals itself as a regional incarnation of one very good idea: a small package of meat or vegetable filling wrapped with carefully cut strips of dough -- like a dumpling. more... 

Recipes From Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan.

Central Asian Culinary Culture
This site is dedicated to the rich culinary culture of the regions of Central Asia in photographic images. The newly independent states of Central Asia are struggling to reassert or create national identities and are now receiving fresh attention from the West. After decades of oblivion, the vast Eurasian continent is once again divulging its intense cultural heritage and foodways to the international community. more...

Food Culture in Russia and Central Asia
Russia and the newly independent states of Central Asia are struggling to reassert or create national identities and are receiving fresh attention from the West. After decades of oblivion, the vast Eurasian continent is once again divulging its intense cultural heritage and foodways to the Food Culture in Russia and Central Asiainternational community. The diversity of food cultures within the former Soviet Union, with more than 100 distinct nationalities, is overwhelming, but Food Culture in Russia and Central Asia brilliantly distills the main elements of contemporary cuisine and food-related customs for students and foodies. Vibrant descriptions of the legacy of the Silk Road; the classic foods such as kasha, pirogi, non (flatbread), pickles, and shashlyk (shish kebab); the over-the-top Moscow theme restaurants; and meals at the dacha and tea time are just some of the highlights.
 
After centuries of contact and conflict among peoples of Eurasia, Russian and Central Asian cuisines and culinary cultures have much in common. To understand one, the other must be considered as well. Russia and Central Asia cuisines share many ingredients, dishes, and customs. This volume strives to emphasize the evolving and multifaceted nature of the food cultures. Readers will be able to appreciate the ingredients, cooking methods, and traditions that make up the Eurasian foodways. more...