English | Russian   
Home
Central Asia
South Caucasus
SPF Issyk-Kul Forum
Silk Route
Events
Publications
Research Centres
Web Links
Newspapers
Join the Mailing List






 
Central Asia and South Caucasus Affairs: 2006
Central Asia and South Caucasus Affairs: 2006
 
Regional Security Issues: 2006
Regional Security Issues: 2006
 
Between the Black and Caspian Seas: New Challenges and Opportunities for the South Caucasus
Between the Black and Caspian Seas: New Challenges and Opportunities for the South Caucasus
 
 
Regional Security Issues
Regional Security Issues
 
The South Caucasus as a Part of the Wider Europe
The South Caucasus as a Part of the Wider Europe
 
In the footsteps of Hsuan Tsang   Last Updated ( Wednesday, 24 January 2007 )
map

Journey to the West on the Silk RoadHsuan Tsang
A photographic chronicle retracing Hsuan Tsang’s heroic 7th century voyage
Hsuan Tsang's journey to the west contributed enormously to the cultural flow between East and West Asia. To reach his destination, the venerable monk had to walk or ride on horseback. He crossed vast deserts, scaled lofty mountains, traversed turbulent rivers, and passed through desolate lands with no traces of human habitation. It is not hard to imagine the dangers and difficulties he had to conquer. In passing through so many kingdoms and states, each with its own customs, languages, and ethnic groups, if it weren't for his outstanding talents and incomparable wisdom, how could he have stayed unruffled when threatened by dangers and challenges? more...

Ultimate Journey: Retracing the Path of an Ancient Buddhist Monk Who Crossed Asia in Search of Enlightenment
In 629, a Chinese Buddhist monk named Hsuan Tsang left the Tang dynasty capital Ultimate Journey: Retracing the Path of an Ancient Buddhist Monk Who Crossed Asia in Search of Enlightenment Chang-an (current-day Xian) and set off to India to see the principal shrines of his religion. His path was arduous, involving the passage of vast deserts and towering mountains, and the record he made of his years-long voyage served generations of travelers along the Silk Road until, finally, it was forgotten.
Richard Bernstein, a former New York Times correspondent in China (and now a book critic for that newspaper), follows Hsuan's trail in this outstanding narrative of his overland journey into the heart of Central Asia, a journey that takes him and the fortunate reader into places that few travelers are privileged to see--places, such as Kashgar and Samarkand, that have storied associations but that remain remote even in the age of CNN and fast jets. Though not without his fears and not without getting into a little trouble, Bernstein talks to just about everyone he meets along the way, pokes into little-known corners of history, and spins a wonderfully literate story of difficult travel that recalls such books as Robert Byron's Road to Oxiana and Bruce Chatwin's The Songlines. Anyone who has ever dreamed of seeing the Ganges River and the Taklimakan Desert will find much pleasure in Bernstein's pages. more... 

Travels of Hsuan-Tsang -- Buddhist Pilgrim of the Seventh Centurymonk
By Irma Marx
Hsuan-tsang or (Xuan Tsang) was born in AD 602. As a child he became already absorbed in the study of the Sacred Books of Chinese literature. While still a boy he was ordained as a Buddhist priest to the Temple of Heavenly Radiance in Hangchow, and soon there after was transferred to the Temple of Great Learning in Chang-an, a community of monks who devoted their lives to the translation of the Sacred Books from India. Listening to the variety of their interpretations young Hsuan-tsang conceived the bold plan to travel to India and bringing back more Sacred Buddhihs Books to China. more...

Buddhist Travellers on the Silk Road 
Buddhism became established in China, many Chinese devotees wished to make the journey to India, the sacred land in which Buddhism was born. The Silk Road was only The Unknown Hsuan-Tsangland route by which the journey could be made, and despite the danger and length of the journey, many monks attempted it. The journeys of two monks in particular became famous because of the accounts which they wrote about their travels. They were Faxien and Xuanzang. more...

The Unknown Hsuan-Tsang 
by D. Devahuti
This book is a collection of translations from original Chinese and Uigur sources on the Buddhist scholar Hsuan-Tsang's life after his return to China from India in AD 645. The editor has provided a commentary that historically contextualizes the documents examined, as well as a biographical sketch of the traveller. more...